Defining prima donna

This letter is in response to Heidi Emmerling Jones` Perspective column in the June issue. First and foremost, I feel the need to correct her definition of "prima donna." According to Miriam Webster, a prima donna is:

Aug 1st, 1996

Dear RDH:

This letter is in response to Heidi Emmerling Jones` Perspective column in the June issue. First and foremost, I feel the need to correct her definition of "prima donna." According to Miriam Webster, a prima donna is:

- A principal female singer in an opera or concert organization.

- An extremely sensitive, vain, or undisciplined person.

The second description above has always been my definition as well. When I am in an office that says their last hygienist was a prima donna, this is the vision I have in my mind. As far as being a "team player," anyone calling themselves by this name should be working with the entire office staff.

The only people mentioned in Ms. Jones` article are the dentist and hygienist. So much for the other staff members. The front desk administrator(s), as well as the chairside assistant(s) and any other team members are also very instrumental in creating a healthy environment where all concerned are equally responsible for the health of their patients and the health of the practice.

Fortunately, I work in an office where everyone, including my employer - Dr. Rodney Rayburn, who is very much a "team player" - have a terrific vision of what a team effort should be. Maybe there are no such offices in the state of Nevada, but I can assure you that we have them here in Houston, Texas.

As far as "Super Stars" go, yes, it`s really true. They are special. But, without the rest of the team, I don`t think they would go very far.

Michael Jordan is one of the best, but I hardly think he could win the NBA championship single-handedly. It takes a team player, and not a prima donna to get the job done.

Linda M. Percell, RDH

Houston, Texas

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